In Short

Belle Barth (April 27, 1911 – February 14, 1971), née Annabelle Salzman,was a Jewish-American comedian who worked primarily during the 1950s and 1960s. She was known for her bawdy, irreverent humor.

Her act and career not only influenced Bette Midler in her early career, but the risk taking and success of her “sophisticated” party albums by Stanley Borden was the basis on which all future “risque” albums of the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s were based, from Richard Pryor to Eddie Murphy.

(Source: Wikipedia)

Dave Chappelle on MTV’s The Grind 1996

cinephilearchive:

Carmen’ (1985) was Alexander Payne’s first short film, made while he was studying at UCLA Film School. It is a silent comedy, derived from the opera of the same name. In the film a mentally challenged gas station attendant is put in charge of the store, which leads to love and a tragic-comic end. With his films ‘Election,’ ‘About Schmidt,’ ‘Sideways,’ ‘The Descendants’ and ‘Nebraska,’ Payne has since become known for his auteur distinctiveness — amplifying the disappointment and regret lurking within the can-do civic culture of middle America, while acknowledging the sweetness and innocence that’s still there. —Cinema 16

At UCLA, Payne’s thesis work, ‘The Passion of Martin,’ received critical praise on the student film circuit and played in Omaha at the old New Cinema Theater. The strength of that film was what attracted Universal’s attention. “I’ve loved film all my life,” Payne said. “I’ve been working and training to be a film director for 10 years, so rather than fear or doubt, I say, ‘Well, here we are.’ I haven’t directed a feature before, but I’ve directed, so I have a hand at what I’m doing.” —Archives: That time Alexander Payne returned to Omaha to make his first movie

Below: a 1996 photo from a private screening of ‘Citizen Ruth.’ From left: writers Jim Taylor and Alexander Payne with the star of the movie, Laura Dern.

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Bob Lassiter - Mr. Airstream 

Lassiter’s unique and provocative style have created a high demand for airchecks of his old shows, many of which are archived online. One of the most notorious of these, known as “Mr. Airstream, is a recording from WPLP on April 1, 1987. It is a phone conversation in which an irate elderly man in an Airstream trailer protests Lassiter’s treatment of old people, as well as the President (who, at the time, was Ronald Reagan) and Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker; threatens to report him to the station management, the FCC, the Chamber of Commerce, and even the police; and ends the call by saying, “Have a bad night, hippie!” Fans of the recording, as well as Lassiter himself, consider it to be the greatest moment in talk-radio history.

Why Man Creates is a 1968 animated short documentary film which discusses the nature of creativity. It was written by Saul Bass and Mayo Simon, and directed by Saul Bass.

The movie won the Academy Award for Documentary Short Subject. An abbreviated version of it ran on the first broadcast of CBS60 Minutes, on September 24, 1968.

Why Man Creates focuses on the creative process and the different approaches taken to that process. It is divided into eight sections: The Edifice, Fooling Around, The Process, Judgment, A Parable, Digression, The Search, and The Mark.

In 2002, this film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.

Quest

By Ray Bradbury, Directed by Elaine and Saul Bass. 


On a distant planet, descendants of a crashed spaceship are subjected to mysterious forces that cause them to age and die in just eight days. They must also live in caves to escape the bitter cold of night and the killing heat of day. One young boy is determined to find his way back to the ship that brought them there. But how will accomplish this in the short time left to him?

Sonny Terry & Brownie McGee In Concert (1974) BBC

The Year of the Sex Olympics is a 1968 television play made by the BBC and first broadcast on BBC2 as part of Theatre 625. It stars Leonard RossiterTony VogelSuzanne Neve and Brian Cox. It was directed byMichael Elliott. The writer was Nigel Kneale, best known as the creator of Quatermass.

Influenced by concerns about overpopulation, the counterculture of the 1960s and the societal effects of television, the play depicts a world of the future where a small elite control the media, keeping the lower classes docile by serving them an endless diet of lowest common denominator programmes and pornography. The play concentrates on an idea the programme controllers have for a new programme which will follow the trials and tribulations of a group of people left to fend for themselves on a remote island. In this respect, the play is often cited as having anticipated the craze for reality television.

Kneale had fourteen years earlier adapted George Orwell's Nineteen Eighty-Four as a classic and controversial BBC broadcast and the play reflects much of Kneale’s assimilation of Orwell’s concern about the power of the media and Kneale’s experience of the evolving media industry.

Nuts in May is a television film devised and directed by Mike Leigh, originally broadcast as part of the BBC's Play for Today series on 13 January 1976. It is the comical story of a nature-loving and rather self-righteous couple’s exhausting battle to enjoy what they perceive to be the idyllic camping holiday. Misunderstandings, awkward clashes of values and explosive conflicts occur when less high-minded guests pitch their tents nearby.

Nuts in May was ranked 49th in the British Film Institute's list of the 100 Greatest British Television ProgrammesNuts in May is highly regarded and often quoted, and as such it could be said to have achieved cult statusVic Reeves and Bob Mortimer chose the film to end At Home with Vic and Bob (1993), which was an evening of programmes scheduled by the duo.

An abandoned movie theater lies in the middle of the egyptian desert

An abandoned movie theater lies in the middle of the egyptian desert

(Source: designboom.com)

peterfromtexas:

When a fire hydrant bursts in freezing weather

peterfromtexas:

When a fire hydrant bursts in freezing weather

The Terracotta Army or the “Terracotta Warriors and Horses” is a collection of terracotta sculptures depicting the armies of Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China. It is a form of funerary art buried with the emperor in 210–209 BC and whose purpose was to protect the emperor in his afterlife.
The figures, dating from approximately the late third century BC, were discovered in 1974 by local farmers in Lintong District, Xi’an, Shaanxi province. The figures vary in height according to their roles, with the tallest being the generals. The figures include warriors, chariots and horses. Current (2007) estimates are that in the three pits containing the Terracotta Army there were more than 8,000 soldiers, 130 chariots with 520 horses, and 150 cavalry horses, the majority of which are still buried in the pits nearby Qin Shi Huang’s mausoleum. Other terracotta non-military figures were also found in other pits and they include officials, acrobats, strongmen, and musicians.

The Terracotta Army or the “Terracotta Warriors and Horses” is a collection of terracotta sculptures depicting the armies of Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China. It is a form of funerary art buried with the emperor in 210–209 BC and whose purpose was to protect the emperor in his afterlife.

The figures, dating from approximately the late third century BC, were discovered in 1974 by local farmers in Lintong DistrictXi’an, Shaanxi province. The figures vary in height according to their roles, with the tallest being the generals. The figures include warriors, chariots and horses. Current (2007) estimates are that in the three pits containing the Terracotta Army there were more than 8,000 soldiers, 130 chariots with 520 horses, and 150 cavalry horses, the majority of which are still buried in the pits nearby Qin Shi Huang’s mausoleum. Other terracotta non-military figures were also found in other pits and they include officials, acrobats, strongmen, and musicians.

(Source: )

The Leshan Giant Buddha (simplified Chinese: 乐山大佛; traditional Chinese: 樂山大佛; pinyin: Lèshān Dàfó) is a 233-foot tall stone statue, built during the Tang Dynasty. It is carved out of a cliff face that lies at the confluence of the Minjiang, Dadu and Qingyi rivers in the southern part of Sichuan province in China, near the city of Leshan. The stone sculpture faces Mount Emei, with the rivers flowing below his feet. It is the largest stone Buddha in the world and it is by far the tallest pre-modern statue in the world.
The Mount Emei Scenic Area, including Leshan Giant Buddha Scenic Area has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1996. It was not damaged by the 2008 Sichuan earthquake.

The Leshan Giant Buddha (simplified Chinese乐山大佛traditional Chinese樂山大佛pinyinLèshān Dàfó) is a 233-foot tall stone statue, built during the Tang Dynasty. It is carved out of a cliff face that lies at the confluence of the MinjiangDadu and Qingyi rivers in the southern part of Sichuan province in China, near the city of Leshan. The stone sculpture faces Mount Emei, with the rivers flowing below his feet. It is the largest stone Buddha in the world and it is by far the tallest pre-modern statue in the world.

The Mount Emei Scenic Area, including Leshan Giant Buddha Scenic Area has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1996. It was not damaged by the 2008 Sichuan earthquake.

Wicked Lady - The Axeman Cometh

To say Wicked Lady were an ultimate cult band is almost an understatement — the U.K. power trio’s contemporary reputation was derived solely from a small if committed live fan base. The Axeman Cometh, with original bassist Bob Jeffries, covering selections from 1969 to 1972, comes from tapes that lead figure Martin Weaver freely admitted in 2012 were done just to keep clear how the songs were performed. Part of the appeal lies in how good everything sounds — for basement recordings by a band with no resources, even the earliest songs stand up pretty well. Vocals are a bit distanced at times, but both the basic riffing and the enthusiastic if unremarkable drumming are clear enough. That the trio was a product of its time is perfectly evident, but for all the heavy riffing the band is playing with, there are moments of individual flair, with Weaver's own work sounding especially inspired, mixing yank-'em, crank-'em tendencies with solid senses of mood while never losing sight of the core rhythm work. While songs like “Living on the Edge” can sometimes feel a bit draggy, nothing ever slows down, and the fairly standard arrangements always give way to a little moment of Weaver glory at some point or another. The opening “Run the Night” features a bit of frenetic soloing from Weaver that could be ahead of its time, and nearly everything else has a similar moment of glory. If “War Cloud” sounds more like a bit of moody folkiness filtered through a touch of Deep Purple, the sentiments aren’t far removed from Black Sabbath. But the instrumental title track, with Weaver pulling off some double-tracked solos careening beautifully over the central chug, is pretty close to its own beast.

1 - Run The Night
2 - War Cloud
3 - The Axeman Cometh
4 - Life And Death
5 - Wicked Lady
6 - Out Of The Dark
7 - Rebel
8 - Living On The Edge